Frequently asked questions

Property sells year round. It is mostly a function of supply and demand, as well as other economic factors. The time of year you choose to sell can make a difference in the amount of time it takes and the final selling price. Weather conditions are often a consideration in some states than in other parts of the country. Generally the real estate market picks up in the early spring. During the summer, the market usually slows. The end of July and August are often the slowest months for real estate sales.

The way you live in a home and the way you sell a house are two different things. First and foremost, "declutter" counter tops, walls and rooms. Too many "things" make it difficult for the buyer to see their possessions in your rooms or on your walls, however don't strip everything completely or it will appear stark and inhospitable. Then clean and make attractive all rooms, furnishings, floors, walls and ceilings. It's especially important that the bathroom and kitchen are spotless. Organize closets. Make sure the basic appliances and fixtures work and get rid of leaky faucets and frayed cords. Make sure the house smells good: from an apple pie, cookies baking or spaghetti sauce simmering on the stove. Hide the kitty litter, and possibly put vases of fresh flowers throughout the house. Pleasant background music is also a nice touch.

Items sellers often disclose include: homeowners association dues: whether or not work done on the house meets local building codes and permits requirements; the presence of any neighborhood nuisances or noises which a prospective buyer might not notice, such as any restrictions on the use of property, including but not limited to zoning ordinances or association rules. It is wise to review the seller's written disclosure prior to a home purchase and ask questions if it does not satisfy you entirely.

Before you close on a home, you should hire a home inspector to evaluate its condition. That way, you avoid surprises after settlement, and you can see the condition of the home firsthand. You can also order additional tests for radon, wood destroying insects or lead paint. The inspection will cover all the major components of your future home. The inspection company may also offer environmental testing services for water quality, radon, lead and asbestos—these services are not standard in all cases, but are worth considering if you're buying an older home.